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Birmingham Convention and Visitor's Bureau:
https://www.birminghamal.org/

Birmingham, AL has a little bit of everything. LITTLE BIT OF EVERYTHING.

Historically significant. Eclectically funky. Progressively southern. Get a feel for the individual enclaves that make our city truly special.

This area is rich in heritage and has a variety of things to offer our attendees.

Whether you come with your Z...or to enjoy the cars at the event...Birmingham has a variety of activities to offer during ZCON week.

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The Magic City, Birmingham...

Birmingham, Alabama, is known as the “Dinner Table of the South.” From the country’s best barbecue to global dishes with the influence of the American South, Birmingham’s dining scene is one to relish.

A talented and energetic music community entertains in clubs and music venues all around the area. Birmingham was Ground Zero for the American Civil Rights Movement, now drawing visitors from around the world to immerse themselves in the historic events. Golfers come to play Birmingham’s courses on the world-class Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail.

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Address: 20 32nd Street North, Birmingham, AL 35222

Sloss Furnaces National Historic Landmark

In the years following the Civil War, railroad men, land developers and speculators moved into Jones Valley to take advantage of the area’s rich mineral resources. All the ingredients needed to make iron lay within a thirty-mile radius. Seams of iron ore stretched for 25 miles through Red Mountain, the southeastern boundary of Jones Valley. To the north and west were abundant deposits of coal, while limestone, dolomite, and clay underlay the valley itself. In 1871 southern entrepreneurs founded a new city called Birmingham and began the systematic exploitation of its minerals.

Colonel Sloss played an important role in the founding of the city by convincing the L&N Railroad to capitalize completion of the South and North rail line through Jones Valley, the site of the new town. In 1880, having helped form the Pratt Coke and Coal Company, which mined and sold Birmingham’s first high-grade coking coal, he founded the Sloss Furnace Company, and two years later “blew-in” the second blast furnace in Birmingham.

Construction of Sloss’s new furnace (City Furnaces) began in June 1881, when ground was broken on a fifty-acre site that had been donated by the Elyton Land Company. A British inventor who designed the stoves that would supply the hot-air blast for the new furnaces. Sixty feet high and eighteen feet in diameter, Sloss’s new Whitwell stoves were the first of their type ever built in Birmingham and were comparable to similar equipment used in the North. Local observers were proud that much of the machinery used by Sloss’s new furnaces would be of Southern manufacture. In April 1882, the furnaces went into blast. After its first year of operations, the furnace had sold 24,000 tons of iron. At the 1883 Louisville Exposition, the company won a bronze medal for ‘best pig iron.’

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Vulcan Park and Museum

The Vulcan statue is the largest cast iron statue in the world, and is the city symbol of Birmingham, Alabama, reflecting its roots in the iron and steel industry.

The 56-foot tall statue depicts the Roman god Vulcan, god of the fire and forge with ironworker equipments.

Address: 1701 Valley View Dr, Birmingham, AL 35209

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Eating is part of the Southern Experience...and BBQ is #1

Check out:

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Alabama Theatre: Since 1927

Built in 1927 by Paramount Studios as an Alabama showcase for Paramount films. The Alabama Theatre was used primarily as a movie palace for 55 years, with the exception of the annual Miss Alabama pageant and the weekly Mickey Mouse Club.

In 1998, the Theatre underwent a complete front door to back door restoration. The work was done by EverGreene Studios from New York City. In 8 months, the theatre went from its look of faded grandeur to a sparkling 1927 look with all the gold leaf paint either replaced or cleaned. In addition to the restoration, new carpet was installed in the ladies lounge and new drapes were installed on the stage and organ chambers.

The theatre is our host for our Movie Night...shh, we can't tell you what's playing just yet...

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Barber Motorsports Museum

1960s
George Barber’s zeal for speed ignited his vision for today’s museum. Having raced Porsches in the 1960s, Barber held an impressive track record—63 first place wins. A thriving business executive, Barber rediscovered his motorsports passion in 1988 and began collecting and restoring classic cars.

Shifting Gears
1988
Since the world’s best and largest car collections had already been established, Barber heeded some wise advice. His longtime friend Dave Hooper – a motorcycle enthusiast as well as the person who ran Barber’s delivery fleet for 27 years – suggested that Barber shift his focus from cars to motorcycles. Being a man of big dreams, Barber seized the opportunity to accomplish what no one else had done – build the world’s “best and largest” motorcycle collection.

An Extraordinary Museum
With its creative architecture and great attention to detail, the museum is home to over 1,600 motorcycles that span over 100 years of production. More than 950 bikes can be seen on any given day, and 200 different manufacturers from 20 countries are represented in the collection—from Harley-Davidson, Honda, and Indian—to Showa, DSK, and Cagiva.

Exquisite Cars
In his passion for motorcycles, George Barber’s love of cars has remained powerful. The museum features the world’s most extensive Lotus collection, anchored by the Lotus 21. The museum also displays rare racecars, including the 1964 Ferrari F-158, in which John Surtees won the 1964 Formula 1 Driver’s World Championship.

More information on their website here:
https://www.barbermuseum.org/the-barber-story/